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20110718
20110718
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
/khrarpblgs us. you have the big main. usually there are 60 or a hundred or 50. the little guys are 20-15-30. if you want to shut off the power you shut off the little guys first than the main. when you throw a switch there is the arch. like water when water flows in an old house any you shut it off quick you get the hammer effect? that's like electricity. is it safe to do it if you smell natural gas? show of hands. >> nobody has their hands up. it's not safe to flicking any switches if you smell natural gas. how about if there is smoke coming out of an outlet. if you shut this off in an area where there is no gas, good idea. >> just about anything can be a hazardous material, cleaners, solvants, hair products anything can be hazardous. they are every where. the only time they are hazardous if they are misused our there is a disaster. do you see these in san francisco? that's probably propane. we have a port. in an industrial area. it identified where they are stored. are there hazardous storage places in this air? no. are there a dry cleaners? yes. who remembers grand auto. they ha
have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in
the tree is big enough that it won't be damaged by that. >> i was wondering if you give advice, if someone has a particular house in a particular location, they know they need a tree, can you help them choose a good one? >> we can. if they're planting a tree in a sidewalk, they would fill out a tree planting permit application. it is really important, we encourage to contact us, because as i said earlier there, are species that won't do well in san francisco, and some of those windy foggy areas of the city, there's only a few tree that is will really thrive there. it is important to make sure you get. >> they can call your office? >> they can call the bureau, get on the website, we have some information on the website about species, we're trying to bolster that, friends of the urban forest is a nonprofit group. they good information on their website about which trees do well. we're happy to give that kind of advice, because we much rather have a healthy urban forest. >> if they wanted to call you, what number would they call? >> the best number. well to get to the bureau directly, 641-2676
a very big problem of conscience for italian women. [speaking italian] [translator] i have a lot of friends who have just one child, but they are very sad to have not been able to see their child's first steps, to have not been able to follow their early stages of life, to see them grow up. because as long as they are growing, children need the presence of their mother. it gives them security. it creates people who are more secure in life. [man speaking italian] [translator] to think about having children today means it is something you really want to do. it is a decision, a choice. when you have decided that you want a child, work and other conditions become relative. having the child becomes the principal objective. if, on the other hand, you are not entirely sure that you want children, then you will find all the excuses in the world. you only need a problem at work, a financial problem, or one of many other little things which then become justification for not making the choice. in the end, they are just excuses. [patuelli speaking italian] [translator] let's say that we woul
in upstate new york for the holiday. it was not a big political thing. it was a holiday. we were just going to go and sing sing christmas carols, do some rap songs, whether we could do to cheer up the brothers that were locked up. we started to do it over and over again. it was only 10 years later and that we began to see ways to use that in a more pro-active way. we would come out of a nightclub in new york city, my brother, my cousin, and i. we had had some experience with the police harassing us on the streets. this particular night, somebody had gotten into a fight, we were probably the only black folks in a white neighborhood the party that they were at, they were playing salsa, marvin gaye, and we were hanging out after the birthday party. we got caught up in a situation where the police had been called for shots fired. we happened to be the only black people there, they got us and put us in jail. that was the first day that you mentioned. the long and short of it is, i was in my second year of law school at the time. i am reading all these things about criminal procedure, criminal la
union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see consistent income coming in. so far, a credit union delinquent rate is quite low because we are working with a client. we want to keep that low and as part of our mission. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last
and that book became "special circumstances," story of a murder in a big law firm. it came out in 2000 and spent seven weeks on "the new york times"' bestsellers' list. so for those of you who have bought my books, i thank you, because now i don't have to practice law full-time anymore. >> but all kidding aside, you know, i think crime novelists and readers of crime novels whether it's lawyer books or whether it's private detectives or cops, you know, in my world i'm like -- unlike tony's, i can control the outcome. i can get justice in my books because i can fix the ending. and i start -- and most authors do i start with the ending. i know who did it, how and why. and by god, when i write that book, i'm going to make sure justice is served. i think that's why people keep coming back to lawyer books in particular because there's a lot of drama in the courtroom. there's always a murder. there's always big stakes. i've written books about death penalty cases. the stakes don't get any bigger than that. and i think it was important to me to have the center of my books a defense att
that carried the heavy downtown interest or big business. you had a lot of candidates on an even keel. what i felt quickly was the strategy to being successful was to build coalitions, and also to approach your communication in a multi land will approach. in my district, it is one of the most ethnically diverse parts of san francisco. we incorporated that. my campaign team was diverse. i had seniors. i had young people. i had different types of volunteers. i had folks that could speak chinese, spanish, someoan, all reaching out to bring people in. there is a certain level of malta and -- of momentum that help people. i would never ask my volunteers to do something i was not willing to do. we were at the bus stop at the morning handing out literature. i think that is critical, to bring into city hall that, yes, i am elected to lead, but more importantly to serve. that is my number one focus point. i am here to serve. when you call me, i am at 4 service. >> what about issues facing san francisco, facing your district, and how you are going to balance the needs of san francisco at large against
of the workers come from outside of the city of amsterdam. they come mostly by car, but also a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from outside. they only come if it is nice to live in your city. k4they were trying to reduce te parking, which was 10%. we went into negotiation with the employers' organizations and with employers, telling them that it is not only a problem of the public, but also a problem of their own companies. it worked. after half a year o
the necessary path of travel for pedestrians but if we open this up so we don't cut a big root. we try to preserve as many roots as we can. >> the path of travel, the city has a minimum travel standard, i believe it is 48 inches. >> it is. >> we easily maintained thap about we see where trees encroach on that or are tripping hazards. >> we never want to go less than 48 inches in the path of travel, ideally, it is more than that, but if it is scrult of losing or keeping a tree we'll shrink down to whatever we need to. >> let's move around the corner, to this. see if we can get in the shade over here. here we have one of those trees. what kind of yuke lip tass is this? >> this is the dollar one. >> i remember that from my tree classes. >> warren knows as much as do i, he's just in the wrong department. we're going to recruit him. >> so, what they call silver dollar. the leaves are the shape and size of silver dollars. silver dollar. >> this is another tree that we see fairly often in san francisco, although, not a tree that we, currently recommend as a street tree, but we'll never take o
mimiael and john ashworth pe to catch a big trout, but they fear fishing stampede rerervoir willllever be the same once 85% of this water is gone. the fish and wililife seseice decicicito takakthis water now atat70,000 acrcrfeet down to 20,0,0 a ae-feet to save the endangered cui-ui fish. at stampede reservoir, terry hardisty, , , source 2. this year fish a a wililife has chosen to use.e. to attempt a cui-i- spawning run in a year where there's veve low natural flow. we've had a low snow year.r. there's a low nanaral flow from natural run-off. if t tre were no resererirs ananno divivsions and no w wer issues, we were backk in the natatal state, ththflow wouldn't be suffifient all by itself to support cui-i- spawnwng run this y yr. ththtown of truckee wawabubut up around the railroad, and d adadional ininststes udededimber, lumber, and ice farming. now the economy is linked more to recreational l urism, and the people of truckee see the water in stataede e servoioi as an esesntial resource that s stains this economyy [eagan] almost eveve level of our e enono relates to the environmentn
the first place winner, mr. wes tyler of union square. wes? big mystery. who's the winner. >> by the process of elimination, it's koit! >> koit. mr. scotty bastopol for the third year in a row. love this city. thank you. >> runners up. the 47th not -- annual cable car bell ringing competition, no particular order, mr. trini whitaker. sullivan philips. ken lunardi. and joseph hsu. come up and get your trophies. thank the judges. [laughter] now it's time for what you've been waiting for, third place, ladies and gentlemen, mr. howard woo. howard woo. again, they're not booing you. all right. mr. ken mcdonald. chief of muni operations officer, please come forward to help me present the second place trophy. second place, ladies and gentlemen. mr. frank ware. and before we announce the winner i'm going to drag this out even longer. i'm going to take a moment to thank the kind people who made the 47th annual cable car bell ringing contest possible the the vice chair of the sfmt board of directors. and friends of the cable car music, union square association, trophy masters shanghai restaurant, ghir
partners. this is a big thank you to microsoft for investing in our kids. before i start, i want to work knowledge a couple of people. our director of san francisco education and a wonderful partner. kimberly is here with her team. marie from the school district, and laurie, who heads our bridge to success program. these are folks that are making all of this happened. thank you for being here. i would like to welcome our host and chancellor from city college to welcome you and opened this up, dr. don griffin. [applause] >> thank you for being here today. i hope you are excited about mission campus. this is one of our finest campuses, but do not be fooled -- we have nine others, most of which are larger than this. we are very excited about you being here. one, i think you made a commitment to go to college, and college has made a commitment to you. we are trying to, this summer for the summer bridge, make college real for you. in other words, so there is no getting lost or confused about how to get financial aid, counseling, and all those things. this program here is for the students. we
you for being here. give yourselves a big round of applause. [applause] all i've got is some fish and a few loaves of bread. and a whole lot of folks have got to get fed. but seven seats were made in under seven days, the first man was forgiven when he missed the hague, the branch was taken by a dove to a book that was built before a flood, if a rainbow sent out a sign, if someone was told to sacrifice his own son and told to hold up before he was done, then the fish and bread that i just said is all that i've got, is all that i need for me to get fed and for me to feed a whole lot of folks in need because they set me on fire. when they look back, i was chilling. i had to fight like 10 older brothers, and because i had this dream, so they sold me out to a band of bandits and one day was commanded to stop, drop, when i got this fish that i found while fishing around, under water with the daughter of the pharaoh, the child was chosen to force the pharaoh to free his folks from a foreign land, repair everywoman, prepare every man, prepare every child, all you've got is that right in
in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments have you had? >> two weeks ago, a new york, it was 400 years ago that new amsterdam was found at -- was founded. they convinced the general director of the new york port authority to put into action a bike accessibility plan, a bike plan for the more than 200,000 employees of the new york port authority. so they convinced these men that it would be a benefit to invest in bike accessibility. the thing is, i don't know, maybe you could put out an opportunity to meet them. we are mainly preaching for people who like our message, but i hardly meet people -- the opposition. i don't know, maybe there are some people who are against too much like accessibility in the room here, but
black people. that big fight, brown versus the board of education so all the black kids can get an education. [inaudible] the books have pages missing, and they all have things written inside of them. at the main library, we have a demonstration going on. [inaudible] how come we cannot use that facility? they cannot even get a good job and fair pay. men, they come up missing. rape -- they do not want to talk about that, but if it is a white woman, it is on the news, on the radio, on television. i do not want to die like that. so i'm going to stay black and die. if i could do one thing -- >> i told you, you need to move on. do i need to get the police?" >> sir, i picked -- "sir, i paid my fare. it is my constitutional right." the driver gets off the bus. police officers come. they are at the back door. "i had trouble with this girl before." "the two of you need to get up. you know it is against the law." open " i paid my fair -- "i paid my fare. if i move now, i will get sick. i'm pregnant." there is a volunteer. i think he was sensing there was going to be trouble or something.
that is not always going to be on super bowl sunday on the big screen. it will not always capture that. if you want to push the revolution now and start handing of guns, you might shoot me, right? we do not have an understanding of exactly what needs to happen and how it needs to happen. i think education is critical. we have to push for an education that we're just not receiving for the most part. there are pockets of that happening, but i think that awareness will produce the next scenario -- the next generation of folks in entertainment, in the arts and all these arenas that are high-profile but with the embedded with this consciousness that will demand the stand up and say something. no more of the michael jordan cannot speak out because politics is not a good thing to speak out against. it will be the jamaican musicians, the peter toshes and bob marleys -- the people -- the politicians had to be responsive to what people were saying and doing because there was a movement around these high- profile folks. they cannot just represent the movement. they have to come out of the movement. it has to
, "this is what we told you it was. this is from here. and this is where it comes from." and that's a big deal. information is a big deal. >> the restaurant has an extremely busy kitchen. but to mills, who's in his sixties, it's like home from home. he knows about the stresses chefs face, since he used to be one. for 14 years, he was the head chef for randy parary restaurants in sacramento. today, he's traded in his chef's hat to promote, educate, and even celebrate produce with other chefs. >> i use email. i use the phone. but the best thing to do is to be able to go into a restaurant, to go into the kitchen, to find the person cooking the food, and say, "hey, what can i get you? what are you looking for?" >> i would just be doing seed production if it weren't for jim driving in here and refusing to drive away and sayin "no, i really want this stuff. no, you don't understand, i really do want to buy this stuff." and "i really want this, and i really want it now, and i really want some, and i wnt samples," and you know, so forth and so on despite my best efforts to get rid of him. >> as c
went in. if that's compromised, you are in big trouble. forcible entry. when do you use forcible entry, what kind of tools do you use? you want to go in -- first thing you need to do is always try to get in the easiest way. what do you want to use to force entry? you can use axs, you are use pry bars or jacks, car jacks. you need to do a lift, you don't have any levers, there's some cars parked outside, you go up and ask the owner of the car, is it okay if i use your car jack? because you're not going to break in, are you? there's always cutting and boring. here is that ax. of course striking and hammering. how do you break glass? at the top, good. we're going to say that this is the glass from here on down, so how would you break it? do i just want to take it like this and smash it this way? no. the end of the board, going to use the end of the board, but i'm also going to remember that the glass can hurt me. if i were to hit it like this, the glass could slide down, cut my hand. so you want to start at the top like he said, hold this down, turn your head away, you start at the top a
producing it with, got t-shirts with a big check minus on it, and we walked into this meeting with check minus shirts on. they're like, "guys, you didn't get a check minus. we all got a check minus." like that was supposed to make us feel better. "we all got a check minus." and so what happened was-- the focus group got a check minus. we had sort of been in hollywood for three years doing pilot, doing things. and so we kind of said, "here's another one that's just not going to work." and so we had an opportunity to go make a movie, this movie, orgazmo, that we got the money for. so we're like, "we're going to make this movie." and they're like, "you can't do that." and then finally a couple months later, they said, "you know what? maybe we will try. write another script, and we'll see." and we ended up writing the kathie lee episode, which became another episode. we wrote that, and then-- you know, but it was all-- again, if it had been based purely on focus groups and that kind of thing, it would have never been on the air. there are people who would find it hard to believe. that comedy
it was a big studio movie. when i was just a filmmaker-- you know, when we were just filmmakers on our own trying to do this-- i know that the m.p.a.a. is illegal. i know it is. i know if someone was to challenge on legal grounds, it's basically a cartel setting up rules. the big guys get to set up the rules. even the little guys have to follow, but they have no say. what did you have to lose to get south park in the theaters? well, we ended up--every time they said, "cut this," we would put something back in that was worse. (parker) they made the movie worse. there's no question. they made that movie raunchier and raunchier. and here's the fascinating thing. here's what it all came down to. so now we're a week away. we're a week away from the movie coming out, and it's still an nc-17. you know, we've done this give and take, but we really kept just making it worse and worse, 'cause they just made us angry. and, um, finally, scott rudin, the producer from paramount-- (stone) there was one joke. i can't remember what it was. and we called up and said, we are not cutting this joke. i don't c
. a big part of what we do is the technical assistance and counseling work we do for folks interested in starting a business or those in the early stages who really need advice about where to go when you run into the wall, about financing, marketing, managing your business. that is an important role we play as well. another role we play is helping small businesses understand how to do contract thing, particularly with the federal government, but in a more general way, with all the public sector players. one of the things that small businesses always need is customers. one of the big customers out there is the public sector, but one of the challenges is the public sector on every level, federal, state, and local, are always difficult for small businesses to understand how to navigate the process of getting certified to do business, finding the right sources to be able to talk to and understand how to navigate getting into the contract thing rolls with public sectors, so we try to help small businesses understand that, and we partner with a lot of organizations -- the city, the state of
day our members show courage in bay area courts, and we do ok in the big battles as well. who will ever forget the extraordinary accomplishments of john in defending our college, patrick, from a crazy federal prosecutor in nevada? that level of talent and that level of courage is unique, but every day criminal courts in the bay area shine because my colleagues from ctla are working there. recently ctla issued a public statement against the death penalty. ctla joins other groups and individuals here today in calling for permanent incarceration as california's alternative to the death penalty. this city and county has a great san francisco public defender and we want to express our thanks to jeff adachi for his support of ctla over the years and for his gratitude for being here today. thank you for your taxi and have a great conference -- thank you for your attention and have a great conference. [applause] >> i also want to acknowledge the public defender, past-present president of the california lawyers association. thank you for being here. now, we have our 50th anniversary tr
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
putting out this fire. you can see that it will make a pretty big mess but at least it put out the fire in your house or something like that. so when we want to shut off electricity is when we see an outlet or something smoking, when you smell that burning smell or if you are not really sure or if you do smell gas and it's safe to do so. if i am in the basement with this set up, this sort of ragedy old set up with switches and i smell gas, is it a good idea to be flicking these? no, because there will be a spark. you should get outside and try to ventilate that garage or enclosed area. these contacts, these are one side and they go into the other side here. see how they are in there now? that's a closed switch right there. it's actually a 3 pull switch. there's 3 different pulls to this switch. they are open, now they are closed, if it's closed it should -- that's when you want to turn it on and off, when it's closed, and then open it if you have to. if you smell gas, you've probably got a leak. if the building is collapsed, there's probably going to be a leak. those are the 3 times you
with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as sch
people are here from out of state and out of country. this was a big deal getting married. we have talked to people together for 38, 40 years. they are excited and nervous. >> once we figured a way to have a security area for appointments for license and ceremony. we looked at the north light court how it's structured. how people would come in and the work flow of that area. there is a check-in area in front of the central entrance and they would verify their appointments and they would proceed. >> my wife who works for the city told me they were looking for volunteers. and that's me. so, i was interested in helping out. and i think it's those people that have been together for a long time that are the most moving story. i am sure the young people appreciate, the more you appreciate the change. >> i think what's also moving is the fact that everyone that works in the city is enthusiastic. everybody in city hall. they are very excited and behind the whole change going into affect. >> i just got an email. i work for the san francisco public library. they needed volunteers. it was something
is the issue? is it a medical problem? if it's a medical, is it a big hurt or a little hurt? is it a rescue situation and if it's a fire, do you have the resources to control or extinguish that fire? how about your situation, do you have all your people? do you have all the resources that you need? have you collected all the material that you need if you are going to start doing a lifting exercise because someone is trapped? because you never start a rescue, you never start a lifting exercise, never start anything, unless you know you are going to be able to finish it, have enough of the resources to do it. and do you have the right equipment? you need specialized equipment? do you have access to that? maybe, maybe not. so size up, you want to establish your priorities, make your decisions. you want to come up with a plan and after you have a plan, you want to take action. remember, it's continuous fact gathering process. you want to evaluate your progress. there are 50 percent of the people can be rescued by who? this is where you come in for the next 30 percent to make it 80 percent of th
that san francisco is not a big business-friendly city. i think we started to go in the wrong direction. the reason why we started walking down that path largely was because of political ideology. when you deal with me, you are dealing with facts, less than politics. i really want to have a positive impact on the city overall. >> good afternoon, everyone. how are you? >> good. >> it's a nice day today. thank you for coming out to our community event. please give a round of [applause] to them. we have a lot of development going on. you see how lovely leland street looks. do you like it? >> yes. >> beautiful, isn't it? we are going to continue. we have a library that is going to be opening up in june. that's right. so i will see you all there at the library. there is a lot of activity going on. it is important we remain connected and engaged. >> would you mind if we were to pull the seniors together and translate for me in a mini meeting? >> yes, sir. >> what we are going ready to do is we are going to have a quick little mini meeting to -- because we didn't translate my short message bef
appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for granted a law that there is a city government here. this was something that brought people together. you heard people talking about it at the cafes, park playground, people who do not always pay attention. in that $0.10, it w
this was a big conspiracy to frame this man. what i learned is -- and i discussed this with geronimo -- we are experiencing men and women who thought the end justified the means. they thought they had a bad man and it was ok to do anything necessary to convict him. as i look back on my career, present and future, i think we see that that is the concept that runs through police misconduct. i am sure there are officers who were just bad, let's say. i think officers see what they consider bad people, and they feel like they have to do what ever it takes to convict them. and i have seen it when i was a young lawyer, when we had narcotics teams, we would get clients to said they arrested me with $20,000 and they said i only had $10,000. and we knew there were telling the truth. it i have seen it with law- enforcement officers in the case where a rogue cop shot a young girl, and the four other officers were all good men. remember -- you talk about misconduct, but primarily -- i want to get back to this -- most law enforcement people i have grown to know in my career are good and i think want to
write novels about the types of cases that lawyers like tony handle. in the daytime i work for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. i write books about san francisco. i studied accounting at the university of illinois. i have been a corporate and securities attorney for 28 years. i've now written seven best-selling novels about murder trials, death penalty cases, and courtroom drama. i have never handled a criminal case in my life. [laughing] so all of you out there who are thinking of writing novels, there is hope. but i did have this feeling a long time ago, probably from the time i was in high school, that at some point i would like to try to write a novel. and i can't expl
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)